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How to Pay Tolls in Georgia?

Paying tolls in Georgia can seem daunting, especially if you’re new to the state or unfamiliar with the toll system. However, with some knowledge and preparation, paying tolls in Georgia can be a breeze. In this blog post, we’ll go over everything you need to know about paying tolls in Georgia, including the different types of tolls, how to pay them, and what to do if you have missed a toll.

Are there any tolls in Georgia?

Yes, there are toll roads in Georgia. The Georgia Department of Transportation operates several toll facilities in the state, including the Peach Pass system, which is used on the Georgia 400, I-85, and I-75 Express Lanes. Additionally, the Georgia State Road and Tollway Authority operate the West Georgia Expressway, a toll road from I-20 to the Alabama state line.

Several toll roads include the Sidney Lanier Bridge in Brunswick and the Talmadge Memorial Bridge in Savannah. It’s always best to check with the Georgia Department of Transportation or the Georgia State Road and Tollway Authority to confirm the list of tolls and how to pay them.

Types of Tolls in Georgia

There are two main types of tolls in Georgia: electronic tolls and cash tolls. Electronic tolls are collected via the Peach Pass system, which is an electronic toll collection system that uses radio frequency identification (RFID) technology to automatically deduct tolls from your account as you pass through a toll plaza. On the other hand, cash tolls are collected at toll plazas, where you can pay with cash, credit or debit card, or a Peach Pass.

How to Pay Electronic Tolls in Georgia

You’ll need to have a Peach Pass account to pay electronic tolls in Georgia. Setting up an account is easy and can be done online or by phone. Once you have an account, you’ll need to add funds to your account, which can be done by credit or debit card or by mailing in a check or money order.

Once your account is set up and funded, you’ll need to affix the Peach Pass transponder to your vehicle’s windshield. This small device emits a radio signal, which electronic toll readers pick up as you pass through a toll plaza. The toll will be automatically deducted from your Peach Pass account as you pass through the plaza.

If you don’t have a Peach Pass, you’ll be charged the toll rate plus a $0.50 fee for each toll you pass through.

How to Pay Cash Tolls in Georgia

If you don’t have a Peach Pass account or prefer to pay cash, you can still pay tolls in Georgia. Simply pull up to the toll plaza, and a toll collector will be there to take your payment. You can pay with cash, credit or debit card, or a Peach Pass.

If you’re paying with cash, have the exact toll amount ready, as the toll collectors do not give change.

How much are Georgia tolls?

The cost of tolls in Georgia can vary depending on the specific road or bridge you are using. For example, the Peach Pass system, used on certain highways in the Atlanta area, has different toll rates for other times of day and vehicles. Additionally, the cost of tolls on the Georgia 400 toll road also varies depending on the time of day and the type of vehicle. It’s best to check the specific toll road or bridge’s website for the most up-to-date information on toll costs.

What to Do if You Miss a Toll in Georgia

If you miss a toll, don’t panic. You’ll receive a bill in the mail for the missed toll, plus a $0.50 fee. If you’re a Peach Pass account holder, the missed toll will be deducted from your account.

If you don’t receive a bill in the mail, you can check your account online or by phone to see if the missed toll was charged to your account. If it wasn’t, you could contact the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) to inquire about the missed toll.

In Conclusion

Paying tolls in Georgia is easy and hassle-free. With electronic tolls collected via the Peach Pass system and cash tolls collected at toll plazas, you have multiple options for paying tolls in Georgia. And if you do happen to miss a toll, there are steps you can take to ensure that you’re not charged an additional fee. So, next time you hit the road in Georgia, be sure to have your Peach Pass or cash ready, and you’ll be good to go.