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Chevy 350 Bored 60 Over Problems

The Chevy 350 is a classic American V8 engine that has been in production since 1967. It has been used in various vehicles and is popular among hot-rodders and car enthusiasts. Boring an engine refers to increasing the diameter of the cylinder walls to increase engine displacement. When the engine is bored 60 over, the cylinder walls have been bored 0.060 inches larger than the original size. While this can increase horsepower and torque, it can also lead to some problems.

Problem 1: Piston Slap

A piston slap is one of the most common problems with a Chevy 350 bored 60 over. A piston slap occurs when the pistons in the engine move around excessively in the cylinder bore. This can lead to a knocking or slapping sound coming from the engine. Piston slap is more likely to occur when an engine has been bored 60 over because there is less material between the pistons and the cylinder walls.

Problem 2: Increased Oil Consumption

Another problem that can occur with a Chevy 350 bored 60 over is increased oil consumption. When the engine is bored 60 over, the cylinder walls are thinner, and this can lead to increased oil consumption. This is because there is less material to contain the oil and prevent it from leaking past the piston rings.

Problem 3: Overheating

Boring an engine 60 over can also lead to overheating problems. This is because the thinner cylinder walls can transfer more heat between the combustion chamber and the coolant. This can cause the engine to run hotter than it should, leading to overheating and potential engine damage.

Problem 4: Lower Compression Ratios

When an engine is bored 60 over, the cylinder walls are thinner, which can lower the compression ratio. This can result in less power and reduced performance. To compensate for this, you may need to use higher octane fuel and make other modifications to the engine.

Problem 5: Cylinder Wall Distortion

Finally, boring an engine 60 over can lead to cylinder wall distortion. This occurs when the cylinder walls become uneven or warped due to the boring process. This can cause the pistons to move around more than they should, leading to other engine problems.

FAQs

  1. Can I bore my Chevy 350 engine 60 over myself?
  • It is not recommended to bore your engine yourself unless you have experience and the proper equipment. It is best to have a professional mechanic or machine shop handle the boring process.
  1. How much does it cost to bore a Chevy 350 engine 60 over?
  • The cost of boring an engine can vary depending on the machine shop and the extent of the work needed. Generally, you can expect to pay several hundred dollars for the boring process.
  1. What maximum amount can a Chevy 350 engine be bored over?
  • The maximum amount that a Chevy 350 engine can be bored over is typically 0.125 inches or 1/8 of an inch. Boring the engine more than this can lead to significant problems.
  1. Do I need to make other modifications if I bore my Chevy 350 engine 60 over?
  • Yes, when you bore your engine 60 over, you may need to make other modifications to compensate for the changes in compression ratio and other factors. This may include using higher octane fuel, upgrading the camshaft, and making other performance modifications.
  1. Can I still use regular oil in a Chevy 350 engine that has been bored 60 over?
  • Using heavier-weight oil in a Chevy 350 engine that has been bored 60 over is generally recommended. The thinner cylinder walls can increase oil consumption, and heavier-weight oil can help reduce this problem.

In conclusion, while boring a Chevy 350 engine 60 over can increase its horsepower and torque, it can also lead to some potential problems that must be carefully considered. These problems include piston slap, increased oil consumption, overheating, lower compression ratios, and cylinder wall distortion. It is important to work with a professional mechanic or machine shop when boring your engine and to mitigate these problems if you decide to proceed.